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Temples in Phuket

Temples in Thailand are actually called Wat, and this is truly a place of worship and respect. In the Buddhism way, people visit temples to make a great merit, free their mind, and listen to Dharma from monks and nuns. Temples are also residence of monks and nuns.

Today temples are still important for Thai society as well as in the old days. Temples have been supplementary monastery school until now and they also become a home to homeless and poor people but those people can also earn education there while enjoying free shelter and food.

Temples can be found every corner of Thailand, why not… when Thailand is a Buddhism country. But there are no temples in every place as enormous as Grand Palace in Bangkok, but the beauty remains history and style of their own. Even temples in Phuket, they are small jewels in green field nearby the main roads and easily reached by cars and motorbike. You can join a day-tour to one of main Buddhist temples in Phuket or even hire transportation.

Besides Buddhist temples, there are Chinese shrines and Muslim mosque in Phuket. Chinese temples and shrines are located throughout Phuket City, and this area gets busiest during the Chinese New Year and Phuket Vegetable Festival with a huge crowd coming to celebrate the events. And a few Muslim mosques are found somewhere around the island when half of Phuket population are Muslim.

However, Buddhist temples are one of the main attractions in Phuket that you should not miss to visit. But remember this… just before entering the temples, Buddhism etiquette is a must to follow: dress properly (no shorts and sleeveless shirts), no physical contact between monks and women, take off shoes and never point feet toward Buddha image, and be quiet and sensitive to cultural and religious consideration. 


Jui tui

It is dedicated to Kiu Wong In, a vegetarian god. Before the altar are cakes, oranges, pineapples and other offerings from devotees.

Also on the altar are a pair of red wooden blocks made from bamboo roots and shaped like twin halves of a mango. These help you make decisions. Pose a question that requires a 'yes' or 'no' answer. Toss the blocks in the air and watch how they land on the floor. If both land with the same side up the answer is 'no'; if they land, one up and one down, the answer is 'yes'. Be sure to leave a donation at the alter. It will go towards the upkeep of the shrine.

Of particular interest at this temple are the fine carvings of guardians on the huge teak doors. Look also at the photos high on the left hand wall which shows the temple in its various incarnations.

This is the temple where many Vegetarian Festival activities take place in the fall. The one of the small service buildings on the left is parked an ornate sedan chair and a chariot on which the image of the deity is placed before it is pulled through the streets of Phuket during the Vegetarian Festival

For a Virtual 360 tour of Jui Tui Tempel, just click on the photo.

This can take a little bit time to load, all depending on the connection to Internet, please be patient.


Pra nahng

Pra Nahng Sahng Temple, The grounds of this temple are where the battle of Thalang took place in 1785.

Inside are three very old statues wrought in tin of the Buddha; they are the largest such in the world and date from the time when tin was regarded as a semi-precius metal.

The bellies of the three big statues each contain a smaller statue, from which derives their name, 'Monks in the belly' in local vernacular, or 'The three kings' in the formal language.

Located on Thep Krasatri Rd. in Thalang town at the traffic light


Pra tong (The Golden Buddha)

Wat Pra Tong, the golden buddhaThis shrine encloses a golden statue of Buddha that sprang up from beneath the earth long ago. The story is of a young boy who tied his buffalo to what he thought was a post; it was in an area at that time given over to the raising of animals.

After doing so he fell down a gooney and died. The father of the boy dreamed that the reason his son had died was for the sin of tying a filthy buffalo to a sacred object, that what the boy thought was a post was in reality the golden peak of the Buddha's conical cap. He told his neighbors the dream and they all went out to dig up the statue but had no success.

Later, at the time of Thao Thep Kasatri's heroic defense against the Burmese in 1785, the invaders tried to succeed where the villagers had failed; their intention was to take the statue back to Burma. Sacred objects and slaves were then most sought after spoil for the armies.

 

monks sitting resting outside wat pra thong temple in phuket, thailandHoly statues brought good luck to their possessors and the slaves were used for work, and to populate places that lacked inhabitants. A frequent problem for the rulers in Southeast Asia, who had great, deal of land but very few subjects.

The Burmese how ever were unable to retrieve the golden Buddha despite several attempts; they were finally driven off by a swarm of angry hornets.

 

 

After this the villagers decided to protect their miraculous statue by covering the part that stuck up from the ground with plaster cast of Buddha's head and shoulder's which is the way it is today.

Located north of the traffic light on the outskirts of Thalang town. A large sign shows the entrance.


Put jaw

Put Jaw Temple. This Chinese Taoist temple is the oldest in Phuket and is dedicated to the Goddess of Mercy.

Built over 200 years ago, it was severely damaged in a fire and renovated about 100 years ago. The main hall holds statues of the goddess and her attendants.


Sanjao sam san

A chinese temple Sanjao Sam San which was built in 1853, this shrine is dedicated to the 'Goddess of the Sea' who serves as the patron saint of sailors.

When a new boat is launched, a ceremony is held here to bless it. It contains some intricate carvings and has a more refined atmosphere than Put Ja


Wat Chalong

Wat Chalong in Phuket ThailandIs Phuket's most important Buddhist temple and is the biggest and most ornate of Phuket's 29 Buddhist monasteries.

The architecture is typical of wats found throughout Thailand. Wat Chalong is associated with the revered monks, Luang Pho Chaem and Luang Pho Chuang, both of whom were famous for there work in herbal medicine and tending to the injured.

During the tin miners' rebellion of 1876 they mobilized aid for the injured on both sides. They also mediated in the rebellion, bringing the warring parties together to resolve their dispute.

Wat chalong in huket, ThailandStatues honoring them stand in the sermon hall (viharn). Many Thais come here to be blessed by the monks and receive a good luck charm in the form of a string tied around the wrist, which they believe protects them from injury and illness.

Many local Thais and Asian tourists will set off firecrackers and ask for the lucky lottery numbers, and have their fortune told. Just inside the main hall on the floor before the image are two cans of what looks like shaved bamboo chopsticks.

 

inside the temple at wat chaolng, phuket thailandPick one up and shake the can back and forth rhythmically until one of the sticks works its way to the top and falls to the floor. Read the number, and then walk around the corner to the right where there is a wooden cabinet on the wall. Open the drawer with the corresponding number and take one of the slips of paper inside. Get someone to translate it for you or bold onto it until you get back to your hotel where the desk clerk can translate it.

 

 

wat chalong in phuket, thailandAlso on the floor are several pairs of red wooden blocks made from bamboo roots and shaped like twin halves of a mango. These help you make decisions. Pose a question that requires a 'yes' or 'no' answer. Toss the pair blocks in the air and watch how they land on the floor. If both land with the same side up the answer is 'no'; if they land, one up and one down, the answer is 'yes'. Whichever form of divination you choose, be sure to leave a donation at the alter. It will go towards the upkeep of the shrine.

From the Chalong traffic circle take the bypass road Why 4021 3km and Wat Chalong is on the right.

For a Virtual 360 tour of Wat Chalong, just click on the photo.

This can take a little bit time to load, all depending on the connection to Internet, please be patient.

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